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Vehicle Hacking

There was a renaissance in distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks in 2016. While the threat against fleets is low, for now, fleet managers need to be on guard as technology such as autonomous vehicles, vehicle-to-infrastructure, and IoT technologies mature.

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FCA Offers Payouts for Hackable Vulnerabilities

FCA is offering a "bug bounty" program that will provide a financial reward to those who can identify vulnerabilities that would affect the safety and security of its vehicles and connected services.

Industry Dialogue Needed to Ensure Regulations Don’t Impede Advances in Fleet Technology

A watershed moment occurred July 21, 2015, with the introduction of a first-of-its-kind bill, the Security and Privacy in Your Car Act. It directs NHTSA to conduct a rulemaking to issue vehicle cybersecurity regulations against unauthorized access to electronic controls or driving data. There are number of stakeholders in the “OBD ecosystem.” In addition to government regulators and auto OEMs, important OBD stakeholders include fleet managers, aftermarket suppliers, and industry associations.

Tesla Model S Hacked, Security Patch Issued

A pair of researchers hacked a Tesla Model S battery-electric vehicle to test its security capabilities, although Tesla has distributed a security patch to all Model S owners, Wired reported.

Vehicle Remote Starting and Door Unlocking Can be Hacked

Recently, a security systems consultant demonstrated that the technology used to link a car to a smart phone can be hacked to gain control of these vehicle functions. The demonstration showed that the wireless communication protocols between a server and a vehicle can be intercepted allowing a hacker to “reverse engineer” the encrypted software protocols. Once the software protocols are replicated, a hacker can maliciously communicate with a vehicle to unlock doors or start the engine.